Adirondack Blue Potato

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One of the newest additions to the Veggie-Bed’s root crop plot is the Adirondack Blue Potato. This young plant started as a potato sprout several weeks ago. When mature the plant will produce underground potato tubers that have a purple tint skin with blue flesh. Bred from ‘Chieftain’ and ‘Black Russian’; this variety was released by Cornell University.

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Sugar Snap

sugar snap
Photo Credit: Tom Myrick

Writer: Tom Myrick

Sponsored By: LawnCare by Tom

The 2019 growing season officially started February 15th at the Veggie-Bed. With the ground temperature above 45 degrees and planting by the moon dates, sugar snap peas were the first seeds to go into the ground.

sugar snaps tw
Photo Credit: Tom Myrick

A cultivar of edible-podded peas, sugar snap peas pods are rounded. Having a less fibrous pod, they are similar in shape to an English pea. Sugar snaps are a cool season legume sowed in early spring that tolerates light frost when young. Capable of climbing to 6 feet a trellis is needed for support by these climbing pea plants.

sugar snap vine
Photo Credit: Tom Myrick

With 75 days from germination to an edible pod, sugar snaps deliver an excellent source of vitamins and minerals. Served in many delicious recipes few make their way to the Veggie-Bed’s kitchen because they taste great right off the vine.

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Row Planting

Between the freezing and thawing, the new vegetable beds are slowly taking shape.

Writer: Tom Myrick

Sponsored By: LawnCare by Tom

After deciding to give the container beds a growing season off here at the Veggie-Bed (zone 8a), we used the traditional way of planting, row planting. Row planting allows for space between rows giving the plants room to grow. Also, planting in rows creates access paths for easy weeding and harvesting. Continue reading Row Planting

Crop Rotation at the Veggie-Bed

crop rotation graph
Graphic by: Tom Myrick

Writer: Tom Myrick

Sponsored By: LawnCare by Tom

At the Veggie-Bed this 2019 growing season, we decided to group vegetables that have similar nutritional requirements in the same beds. The groups are designated to the following categories:
• Leaf Crops (utilizes nitrogen in the soil)
• Legume Crops (replenishes nitrogen in the soil)
• Root Crops (utilizes potassium in the soil)
• Fruit Crops (utilizes phosphorus in the soil) Continue reading Crop Rotation at the Veggie-Bed

Soil Texture

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Writer: Tom Myrick

Sponsored By: LawnCare by Tom

Soil conditions vary; however, there are some common soil requirements for most vegetable plants. Vegetable garden soil should not consist of excessive sand or clay. It should support lose and well-draining qualities. A combination of sand, silt, and clay constitute most soils. The relative percentage of this combination is the soil texture. Continue reading Soil Texture

Veggie-Bed Plan for 2018

Writer: Tom Myrick

Sponsored By: LawnCare by Tom

After determining how much space the Veggie-Bed needs, two plots of 20 ft by 10 ft was decided. To have plenty of room to work between rows at least 18 inches between rows was considered. The location chosen receives six to eight hours of full sun and a water source nearby.2019 Vegetable Garden Plan Complete 2

Organizing plants in specific groups on different parts of the Veggie-Bed plots allows easy crop rotation each season. Crop rotation helps reduce crop-specific pest and disease problems. Continue reading Veggie-Bed Plan for 2018