30 Days Ago

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We started this young broccoli plant from seed 30 days ago. Later this month, we will transplant the plant and most of the other broccoli plants into the garden. However, several of the plants will be grown in 3-gallon containers on the patio in which they do well.

Writer: Tom Myrick twitter-button

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Await Their Turn

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As more and more leaf vegetable seedlings leave the seed incubator, the greenhouse is becoming full of young plants. These leaf vegetables (collards, broccoli, and kale) await their turn to go into the garden.

Writer: Tom Myrick twitter-button

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DAY 30: Growing Collards from Seeds

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After the hardening-off process, we moved these young collard plants to the greenhouse and monitor for uneven temperatures until plants become acclimated to the environment. Some of the collards will be transplanted to the garden, while others are grown in the greenhouse.

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Leaf Vegetable Seedlings – Winter 2021

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These young leaf vegetables (collards, broccoli, and kale) have sprouted from seeds. They will continue to grow in the controlled environment of the incubator for the next several weeks. When the outside temperatures reach an optimal growing condition, we will move the young plants to the greenhouse.

Writer: Tom Myrick twitter-button

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DAY 20: Growing Collards from Seeds

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These young collard plants are ready to be hardened off and moved to the greenhouse. The young plants are placed outside and exposed to the sunlight and uneven temperatures for brief periods for several days. This process allows them to become acclimated to the environment.

Writer: Tom Myrick twitter-button

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DAY 10: Growing Collards from Seeds

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In this photo, the collard seedlings are developing true leaves above the embryonic leaves (cotyledons). The development of the true leaves initiates the photosynthesizing process.

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DAY 6: Growing Collards from Seeds

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Collards are dicotyledons (dicots) because they produce two cotyledons or embryonic leaves. This photo shows the young embryonic leaves that appear above the soil from the seed embryo. Eventually, true leaves develop above the two embryonic leaves.

Writer: Tom Myrick twitter-button

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