About Tom Myrick

"When life kicks you in the butt, use it as energy for forward motion", Tom Myrick. I graduated from a TV/Radio Broadcasting curriculum in 1988. Working as a professional TV News Photojournalist/Media Production Specialist for most of my adult life, I became proficient in many aspects of multimedia production. After completing the Master Gardener program in 2006, I started attending horticulture classes at a local community college. Writing, photography, and gardening are passions of mine. Having a diversified set of work skills and a lifetime of experience, I have written for several online vegetable gardening publications. My mission is to encourage unity and peace among all people throughout the world through vegetable gardening. Play in the dirt, Tom

Vegetables Are Rotated Seasonally

NO-TILL, RAISED-ROW, ORGANIC GARDEN

“Crop rotation was practiced by farmers in ancient Rome, Greece and China. Ancient Middle Eastern Farmers rotated crops as early as 6000 BC. Crop rotations improve soil tilth, reduce pest, weed and disease pressure and increase biodiversity on the farm.” (bioneers.org)

Over ten years in the making, the Veggie-Bed is a no-till, raised-row, organic garden in which the vegetables are rotated seasonally.

YEARLY CROP ROTATION

Located in the suburbs of the Western Branch area, the property is only 3/4 of an acre, and we use approximately 450 square feet in the backyard. The garden is section-off into two 20 by 10-foot gardens. Each section is divided into two ten by 10-foot plots where vegetables are grown according to their type (root, leaf, legumes, fruit).

VEGGIE-BED LAYOUT

Concentrating on quality and not quantity, we give each plant plenty of room to grow and increase its yield.

QUALITY NOT QUANTITY

We mix organic compost from our compost pile into each row during the winter months.

AMENDED WITH ORGANIC COMPOST

No fertilizer, pesticides, or herbicides are used in the gardens.

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A Late Start

Photo credit: Tom Myrick

In this small section of young leaf-vegetables, they enjoy the rain and mild temperatures. Getting off to a late start this season, these leaf-vegetables should reach maturity in several weeks.

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Garden Candy

Photo credit: Tom Myrick

Planted back in March, these young sugar snaps have survived the extreme weather fluctuations here this spring. Sugar snaps have a sweet, edible pod and are referred to as ‘garden candy’.

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Grown from Scrap Roots

Photo credit: Tom Myrick

After seeing this hack online, we put it to the test here at the Veggie-Bed. These mature spring onions were grown from scrap roots, and we are letting them flower to produce seeds. The seeds will be for sowing next season and hopefully adapt to our soil and climate conditions.

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Abundant Fresh Leaf Vegetables

Started indoors from seeds back in February, these red kale plants were the first plants to go into the ground this season. Once fully grown, they will provide abundant fresh leaf vegetables for a household of four throughout this season.

We planted them in the section where beans were grown last year.

This practice is part of our vegetable plant rotation to promote soil health.

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A Hectic Morning

We had a hectic morning here at the Veggie-Bed cleaning up our neglected garden. The first order of business was to pick all the ripe vegetables. Later this afternoon, any plant with signs of infestation or disease will be removed and placed in the trash.

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If you would like to be a part of Urban Gardening’s mission of encouraging and sharing information about vegetable gardening throughout the world, please join our group on Facebook: