Black Turtle Beans

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One of our goals at the Veggie-Bed is to perfect and practice sustainable gardening techniques. Another objective is trying different varieties of vegetables that grow well in our region. Year after year, beans (bush) have yielded good results. This growing season we are experimenting with growing Black Turtle (bush) shelling beans. We are prepping these beans for the seed germinating incubator this morning.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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No-till Gardening Underway

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With the second season of no-till gardening underway here at the Veggie-Bed, the soil amendment and cultivating phase has started.

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Last season we turned over the top layer of soil to remove weeds and create the raised rows.

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This season a layer of pathogen-free composted cow manure was applied to the rows and lightly worked in, leaving the surface undisturbed. The manure improves soil quality while acting as a slow-release fertilizer.

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Young plants are growing in the greenhouse, awaiting for transplanting into the garden when the right conditions prevail.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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Snow Peas?

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Maybe we should have sown snow peas instead of sugar snaps -lol-

Snow peas have flat edible pods with small peas. They are sometimes confused with sugar snaps, which are a cross between snow and garden peas.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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Pathogen-Free Composted Cow Manure

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Make sure to use pathogen-free manure if you are using packaged manure, check the label!

A busy day amending the soil with pathogen-free composted cow manure here at the Veggie-Bed. Over the next six weeks, we will continue to cultivate the soil blending in the manure. The manure improves soil quality while acting like a slow-release fertilizer.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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Made Their Way

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The first group of seedlings has made their way from the seed incubator to the greenhouse. Among the seedlings are collards, spinach, kale, and sugar snaps. They will continue to grow there until they can be transplanted outdoors here at the Veggie-Bed.  The next group is not far behind.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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Full Throttle

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Here at the Veggie-Bed, the seed germination incubator is running full throttle. The first flat of collard seedlings was moved from the incubator to the greenhouse to harden off and continue growing. The young plants will be kept in the greenhouse until they can be planted in the ground or sold.  New seeds are placed in the incubator for germinating. This process is running 24/7.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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The First Flat

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The first flat of seeds for this season was placed in the seed germination incubator. Seeds that were planted are broccoli, collards, kale, and spinach. They will remain in the incubator at an average temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit, and 16 hours of light daily, and moisture is applied as needed. When the seedlings have 1-2 sets of true leaves, they will be hardened off by gradually introducing them to the outdoor greenhouse during the day and bringing back to the incubator at night. This process takes about one week before the plants are ready to go into the garden.

Writer: Tom Myrick

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